Friday, July 20, 2007

Book #14 - The Gospel According to Starbucks

A few months ago I received a shipment from the Relevant Network. The usual stuff - five or six books, four or five CDs, a handful of Relevant Magazine and Radiant Magazine, and a DVD. After reading First, Break All the Rules, I needed something a little bit light. So I picked up The Gospel According to Starbucks by Leonard Sweet. This book arrived in the Relevant Network shipment.

Leonard Sweet tries to tie together to community and connections that are built at Starbucks to the need for the Church to embrace the same drive. It's definitely not the deepest book I have ever read. Sweet makes some good points. There is nothing earth shaking new here. If you are in a church that doesn't do community well, this may be a good book to pick up.

4 comments:

Keith McIlwain said...

I've always found Sweet to be a bit of "theology lite", which was confirmed for me when he visited our Conference a few years back. Harmless, but not a great deal of substance.

Roda Zone said...

I agree with Keith...I can't believe I just said that!

Pamela said...

http://www.northumbriacommunity.orgindex.html

I have included the web address above because I am very interested in Christian community and feel that in order to be a light on a hill, we as christians need to take that concept more seriously. It seems that during times of great persecution folks close ranks and become cohesive in the manner of the book of Acts, otherwise what we call church on Sunday resembles more a casual trip to starbucks. Christian Community is a serious committment and involves being accountable to discipleship to the other member in the community in ways that most people would say is "none of their business".
I had an opportunity to experience this once. I miss the depth of the fellowship.

Pamela said...

Correction, I meant to say, " can resemble a casual trip to starbucks". Thankfully there are folk who take worship on Sunday seriously, but there are the other six days of the week that all too many forget about.